IMA Source Catalog

Gathering all the sources for historical Irish martial culture in one place.

The Cork Examiner, 17 December 1912

DUBLIN TRAMP
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SERGEANT STABBED
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SCENE ON WICKLOW ROADSIDE
—— Arklow, Saturday.        The story of a fierce attack on a policeman was told yesterday evening at Rathdrum Workhouse hospital, when Mr A. Burke, J.P., attended to take the deposition of Sergeant Thos. Maguire, Aughrim, who, it is alleged, was repeatedly stabbed in the neck and head by a burly fellow who gave his name as Wm. Burke, but refused his address in Dublin.
   Sergeant Maguire stated that on the previous evening he was on patrol. A complaint was made about the conduct of two tramps outside Aughrim Catholic Church. He went to the spot and found an altercation going on between the prisoner and another man. Burke was using very vile language. Witness succeeded in getting both men away. Burke’s attitude was very violent, and witness followed him to put him past houses where there were women and small children. The prisoner then turned on him and said, “I have done nothing yet, but I will do something now.” He then rushed at witness with an open knife in his hand. He tried to defend himself with his stick and closed with the prisoner, whom he dropped in the water-table beside the road. While on the ground the prisoner stabbed him repeatedly in the neck and head.
   When the knife was produced the prisoner asked the magistrate to do him a favour and allow the police to give him the knife in order that he might cut his throat at once.
   Constable McNulty stated that when he heard of the incident he went in search of Burke, whom he overtook at Tinakilly. On seeing him the accused ran into a field where there was a large heap of stones, and began to throw them at witniess. When this ammunition was exhausted the prisoner drew a knife, and when witness closed with him he attempted to stab him in the body. He had Burke by the throat with one hand, and in defending himself from a blow of the knife directed at his stomach witness was stabbed in the hand. He succeeded eventually in disarming the prisoner of the knife, and when arrested Burke began to curse and use very bad language.
   The prisoner was remanded in custody for eight days.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, knife, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 1 October 1856

GRIEVOUS ASSAULT.
   Laurence Daly was charged with a grievous assault on James Bowden and John Henry Colvin, both members of the society of Friends, on the 21st August last, at Ballinure.    John H. Colvin and James Bowden were examined by Mr. P. O’Connell, Crown-solicitor, and proved that they were walking towards the Douglas Post-office, about 6½ oclock, on the evening in question, when between Mr. Crawford’s gate and Douglas, they perceived a man shouting towards them ; he appeared in a sailor’s dress, and had a bag or something in his hands ; when he came up to them, he accused them of throwing stones at him, which they denied, whereupon he struck Colvin with his clenched fist on the side of the head, and then took Mr. Bowden’s stick from him, and struck him with great force on the head, and cut his head in two places throught [sic] his hat ; they then struggled with him and got him down, calling loudly for help, when finding no one coming to their assistance, they thought it best to run away ; they had come to arrange the affairs of a deceased friend of theirs, who had been a tutor at Mr. Pike’s. Mr. Colvin was from Dublin, and Mr. Bowden from Surrey. 
   Mr. O’Hea, with Mr., Gillman, defended the prisoner, and called Mr. Denis Murpy as to character. The defense was, that the prisoner was under the impression that the prosecutors had been throwing stones at him. 
   The jury found him guilty of an assault occasioning actual bodily harm, one of the jurors in answer to his Worship amidst much laughter, stating that they had come to that decision without being influenced either by Mr. O’Hea’s eloquent speeches or his worship’s able charge. 
   The Court sentenced the prisoner to twelve months imprisonment at hard labour, observing that in his experience as Assistant Barrister for 20 years in this and the adjoining County he had never heard of a more unprovoked assault. Previous to that case he could assert that it was as safe to walk the roads of this county at night as the high streets of London in the day time, and that it was his duty, by the sentence in this case, to prevent such a thing occurring again.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , , , | Leave a comment