IMA Source Catalog

Gathering all the sources for historical Irish martial culture in one place.

Faction Fighting Documentary

Here are links to a three part Irish Language documentary on Faction Fighting. I had my doubts at first but was pleasantly surprised. Highly recommended.

Na Chéad Fight Clubs (P1)

Na Chéad Fight Clubs (P2)

Na Chéad Fight Clubs (P3)

December 29, 2010 Posted by | as crime, Faction fight descriptions, Historical descriptions, other weapon, prowess, Stickfighting schools | , , , , , | 1 Comment

BALLINA CHRONICLE Wednesday, July 3, 1850

At Galway Petty Sessions Mr. Thomas Hardy prosecuted Mr. Frederick P. Knight for having struck him with a stick and afterwards kicked him. The magistrates find the offender 2l. or a month’s imprisonment. Mr. Knight paid the fine and left the court. Shortly after Mr. Hardy returned to complain that immediately after going out Mr. Knight called him a “cowardly ruffian” and spat in his face. The magistrate having ordered Mr. Knight to be again brought up fined him 5l. or two months’ imprisonment.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 17 December 1912

DUBLIN TRAMP
——
SERGEANT STABBED
——
SCENE ON WICKLOW ROADSIDE
—— Arklow, Saturday.        The story of a fierce attack on a policeman was told yesterday evening at Rathdrum Workhouse hospital, when Mr A. Burke, J.P., attended to take the deposition of Sergeant Thos. Maguire, Aughrim, who, it is alleged, was repeatedly stabbed in the neck and head by a burly fellow who gave his name as Wm. Burke, but refused his address in Dublin.
   Sergeant Maguire stated that on the previous evening he was on patrol. A complaint was made about the conduct of two tramps outside Aughrim Catholic Church. He went to the spot and found an altercation going on between the prisoner and another man. Burke was using very vile language. Witness succeeded in getting both men away. Burke’s attitude was very violent, and witness followed him to put him past houses where there were women and small children. The prisoner then turned on him and said, “I have done nothing yet, but I will do something now.” He then rushed at witness with an open knife in his hand. He tried to defend himself with his stick and closed with the prisoner, whom he dropped in the water-table beside the road. While on the ground the prisoner stabbed him repeatedly in the neck and head.
   When the knife was produced the prisoner asked the magistrate to do him a favour and allow the police to give him the knife in order that he might cut his throat at once.
   Constable McNulty stated that when he heard of the incident he went in search of Burke, whom he overtook at Tinakilly. On seeing him the accused ran into a field where there was a large heap of stones, and began to throw them at witniess. When this ammunition was exhausted the prisoner drew a knife, and when witness closed with him he attempted to stab him in the body. He had Burke by the throat with one hand, and in defending himself from a blow of the knife directed at his stomach witness was stabbed in the hand. He succeeded eventually in disarming the prisoner of the knife, and when arrested Burke began to curse and use very bad language.
   The prisoner was remanded in custody for eight days.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, knife, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , , | Leave a comment

BALLINA CHRONICLE Wednesday, August 1, 1849

DARING OUTRAGE- GALLANT CONDUCT OF A FEMALE – On Sunday morning, the 22nd inst., some persons called at the bed-room window of a farmer, named Gilbert Egan, residing near Lisduff, and desired him to get up that all of his property was stolen; upon which his wife got out of bed and opened the door; when four fellows fiercely rushed in, following her into the bed-room where her husband was asleep. One of them had two stones in his hands; and while he was in the act of lifting his hand to strike Egan, Mrs. Egan caught him by the breast, knocked him down and took one of the stones from him. Another of the party then struck her with a large stick on the hands and shoulders, whereupon her husband jumped out of bed, seized the fellow by the throat and took the stick from him. Egan and his wife then armed themselves and beat the party out of the room, and while doing so, Egan received a severe cut in the temple which deprived him of strength. Nothing daunted, Mrs. Egan and two of her children encountered three of the ruffians in the kitchen, but in the struggle she and her children were severely assaulted. She called repeatedly to her servant boy, and a schoolmaster named Cleary, who were in the house, to come to her assistance and make prisoners of the party. This they very cowardly and disgracefully refused to do, alleging they were afraid of being killed! On leaving they told her to make her husband give up the land he had lately taken or they would give him a barbarous death. Two of the party have been arrested and identified and fully committed to Nenagh gaol. —Nenagh Guardian.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, Faction fight descriptions, Old Newspaper clippings, prowess | , , , , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer September 24, 1859

COWARDLY ASSAULT

John GREGG v. Patrick FANNAN

The complainant conducted his own case. Mr. M’Gauran of Cavan appeared for the defendant. The complainant is shopman to Mr. John SHERA, and a most inoffensive young man.

John GREGG sworn–On Friday night, the 9th inst., was returning from a prayer meeting in the Wesleyan Chapel, which he has been in the habit of attending for the last five or six years; saw seven or eight men on the footway, at Matthew BANNON’s public house; walked off into the channel to escape them; the defendant followed him, and caught him round the neck; gave him “a foot,” and tumbled him; as soon as he fell another of the party came and struck him with a stick, and another with his fist. Mr. SHERA and some others then came up, and the cowards ran away; Mr. Shera followed defendant; witness thought it better to let his prisoner go, and run to Mr. Shera’s assistance; did so, and when he came up another ruffian ran and struck Mr. Shera; took defendant prisoner, and brought him to the barrack.

To Mr. M’Gauran–There were two or three assisting in bringing prisoner to the barrack; did strike defendant after he was arrested; does not believe he gave him a black eye, but might have done it; defendant was not drunk; swears positively he wasn’t; witness is considered smart, and had a tight race to catch him; that wasn’t like a drunken man; Mr. Shera had no umbrella, nor did not strike defendant.

Mr. Moorhead–A very important question has arisen. You swear you struck the defendant after he was arrested. Why did you do so?
Witness–Your Worship, after he was arrested he made several attempts to strike and kick Mr. Shera and myself; it was than I struck him.
Chairman–Are we to understand it was in self-defence you struck him?
Witness–Yes.
Mr. M’Gauran–Did you not jostle defendant before he assaulted you?
Witness–No; on the contrary I left the footpath to escape the prisoner; I ran to Mr. Shera’ assistance when a number of the party went to rescue the prisoner.
Mr. M’Gauran–Do you swear they wanted to rescue him?
Witness–I do; for they cried out to rescue him; I do not know who the other parties were.
Mr. M’Gauran–Will you swear defendant was not drunk?
Witness–I will.

Richard HUMPHRYS (a most intelligent lad of about 12 years old) sworn–Was coming home with John GREGG on the fair night; saw a number of men at BANNON’s public house door; John Gregg went off the footpath rather than pass through them…

The Chairman–Mr. M’Gauran, have you any witnesses for the defence?

Mr. M’Gauran–No, your Worship. I admit my client acted wrong, and that he has a right to be punished; but I would wish to state a few extenuating circumstances, that you may be pleased to award the punishment accordingly. As I am instructed by my client, he was unfortunately out on the night in question, and had taken too much drink this young man, Gregg, as I am instructed, jostled against him, and he confesses he struck him….Taking all these circumstances into account, I hope your Worships will consider a very small penalty sufficient.

The Chairman–The decision of the Bench is that you be imprisoned one month, with costs.

Head-Constable HARRISON summoned Farrel M’GOVERN, publican, for having his house open at prohibited hours for the sale of spirituous liquors. Fined 10s. and costs.

A few trifling cases having been heard, the Court rose.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , , , | Leave a comment