IMA Source Catalog

Gathering all the sources for historical Irish martial culture in one place.

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Saturday 7 November 1835

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Saturday 7 November 1835
…..At this
juncture, Mr. Constable Moore, who described himself as standing just opposite
Mr. Bruce’s door, came up and interfered in behalf of the latter; and after
an exchange of high words between the
parties, Moore collared Whelan with a
view of taking him to the watch-house
for having pushed Bruce, who refused to
go until he had delivered something he
had with him, at his master’s house.
Upon this, Moore, who was divested of
his jacket or baton of office, struck the
defendant a violent blow over the head
with his shillelagh, which the other resented by an immediate application to
fisticuffs. Moore being disarmed of his
shillelagh by some of the by-standers, in
order to render the encounter on a more
equal footing, he got considerably the
worst of the pugilistic scuffle that ensued
as a charming pair of black eye», with
beautifully cut nose and face could fully
testify; upon which be prudently withdrew to the adjoining watch house, where
having procured a reinforcement of authority, be returned to the scene of tumult,
and triumphantly bore off his antagonist
into custody.

October 7, 2012 Posted by | as crime, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism | Leave a comment

Bareknuckle Technique from a drawing at Kilmainham gaol, Dublin (Ireland) – Year 1818

Bareknuckle Technique from a drawing at Kilmainham gaol, Dublin (Ireland) – Year 1818

Contributed by Thorsten Schindler.

July 4, 2012 Posted by | Period illustration, political cartoons, pugilism | | Leave a comment

New York Times December 5, 1857

Version:1.0 StartHTML:0000000168 EndHTML:0000001857 StartFragment:0000000489 EndFragment:0000001840ERIE RAILROAD STRIKE. Two Hundred Men Discharged at Peirmont – They Drive Off New Employees. Twenty-Five Metroploitan Volunteers Dispatched to the Scene of Riot. THE RIOTERS ARMED WITH MUSKETS AND CANNONS.

 

…Heedless of their threats, however, the Superintendent came to the city and hired two hundred laborers, who were got together and sent ip to Piermont on Thursday. They found upon their arrival the whole place up in arms and ready to give them a warm reception. They attempted to land but were warned off, but being placed alongside the dock by the steamboat there was bo alternative but to land and vindicate their claim to hold the place against the rebels. Clubs, stones, and missles of all kinds were now put in requisition, adnt he invanding and repelling forces were joined in a fierce contest. The new comers were seized and pitched into the dock, they were pummeled with shillelaghs and fists until they were obliged to beat a retreat. They entrenched themselves on board the boat, put their wounded under the care of the surgeon, (the cook,) and waited for thte steamer to carry them back to the City…

January 28, 2009 Posted by | as crime, Faction fight descriptions, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer September 3, 1864

ASSAULT

Thomas M’KEON summoned James REEHILL for an assault. The case had been postponed on a previous day in consequence of the complainant being unable to attend….

Thomas M’KEON examined by Mr. M’Gauran–Lives in Ballanacarry; on the 18th of August last was lifting flax off the spread, and drawing it with a horse and cart; was passing by a meadow where REEHILL was mowing; on coming up to him bid him “the time of the day;” he replied that he would not allow any one to speak to him who had threatened to break his bones; I said I had never threatened to do so; he then jumped out on the road and struck at me with his fist; I warded off the blow as best I could; he then kicked me….In about an hour I began to feel the effects of the kicks…….

The Bench ordered Reehill to pay a fine of 10s and costs.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism | , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer March 3, 1860

Patrick MONAGHAN, appellant; Sub-Inspector WEIR, respondent.

In this case the appellant had been sentenced to two months’ imprisonment, at the Ballyjamesduff Petty Sessions, for an assault upon the respondent, who is Sub Inspector of Constabulary at Ballyjamesduff.

Messrs. James and John Armstrong appeared for the appellant. Mr. S. Knipe appeared for the respondent and briefly stated the case.

Sub-Inspector WEIR was then called and examined.–On the 10th of January I was sitting in my own house; it was between 5 and 6 o’clock; I heard a row in the street opposite my house; I ran out and saw several persons fighting; MONAGHAN and a man named CRUMMY appeared to be the worst; they were in grips, fighting; I ran over, and caught each of them by the throat and told them they should come with me; CRUMMY’s wife told him not to resist; she said “for God’s sake go quietly;” MONAGHAN resisted and struck me several times with his fist….James M’GEBNEY deposed he was looking on during the assault on Mr. WEIR, and previously, saw CURRY and MONAGHAN fighting; they were fighting when Mr. WEIR ran out; saw MONAGHAN strike Mr. WEIR several blows…

Thomas CRUMMY examined by Mr. Armstrong–Is a broguemaker, and on the night of the row was quarrelling with another broguemaker, named COLWELL; it wasn’t a fight–only an argument about trade. Here Mr. CRUMMY turned and poured forth a torrent of vituperation upon the previous witness, calling him a thief, a robber, &c., and shouting that he (Mr. C) had to be constantly watching his potatoes to prevent him from stealing them……He was at length interrupted by the Chairman, who inquired if he knew where the gaol was?

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 1 October 1856

GRIEVOUS ASSAULT.
   Laurence Daly was charged with a grievous assault on James Bowden and John Henry Colvin, both members of the society of Friends, on the 21st August last, at Ballinure.    John H. Colvin and James Bowden were examined by Mr. P. O’Connell, Crown-solicitor, and proved that they were walking towards the Douglas Post-office, about 6½ oclock, on the evening in question, when between Mr. Crawford’s gate and Douglas, they perceived a man shouting towards them ; he appeared in a sailor’s dress, and had a bag or something in his hands ; when he came up to them, he accused them of throwing stones at him, which they denied, whereupon he struck Colvin with his clenched fist on the side of the head, and then took Mr. Bowden’s stick from him, and struck him with great force on the head, and cut his head in two places throught [sic] his hat ; they then struggled with him and got him down, calling loudly for help, when finding no one coming to their assistance, they thought it best to run away ; they had come to arrange the affairs of a deceased friend of theirs, who had been a tutor at Mr. Pike’s. Mr. Colvin was from Dublin, and Mr. Bowden from Surrey. 
   Mr. O’Hea, with Mr., Gillman, defended the prisoner, and called Mr. Denis Murpy as to character. The defense was, that the prisoner was under the impression that the prosecutors had been throwing stones at him. 
   The jury found him guilty of an assault occasioning actual bodily harm, one of the jurors in answer to his Worship amidst much laughter, stating that they had come to that decision without being influenced either by Mr. O’Hea’s eloquent speeches or his worship’s able charge. 
   The Court sentenced the prisoner to twelve months imprisonment at hard labour, observing that in his experience as Assistant Barrister for 20 years in this and the adjoining County he had never heard of a more unprovoked assault. Previous to that case he could assert that it was as safe to walk the roads of this county at night as the high streets of London in the day time, and that it was his duty, by the sentence in this case, to prevent such a thing occurring again.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer September 24, 1859

COWARDLY ASSAULT

John GREGG v. Patrick FANNAN

The complainant conducted his own case. Mr. M’Gauran of Cavan appeared for the defendant. The complainant is shopman to Mr. John SHERA, and a most inoffensive young man.

John GREGG sworn–On Friday night, the 9th inst., was returning from a prayer meeting in the Wesleyan Chapel, which he has been in the habit of attending for the last five or six years; saw seven or eight men on the footway, at Matthew BANNON’s public house; walked off into the channel to escape them; the defendant followed him, and caught him round the neck; gave him “a foot,” and tumbled him; as soon as he fell another of the party came and struck him with a stick, and another with his fist. Mr. SHERA and some others then came up, and the cowards ran away; Mr. Shera followed defendant; witness thought it better to let his prisoner go, and run to Mr. Shera’s assistance; did so, and when he came up another ruffian ran and struck Mr. Shera; took defendant prisoner, and brought him to the barrack.

To Mr. M’Gauran–There were two or three assisting in bringing prisoner to the barrack; did strike defendant after he was arrested; does not believe he gave him a black eye, but might have done it; defendant was not drunk; swears positively he wasn’t; witness is considered smart, and had a tight race to catch him; that wasn’t like a drunken man; Mr. Shera had no umbrella, nor did not strike defendant.

Mr. Moorhead–A very important question has arisen. You swear you struck the defendant after he was arrested. Why did you do so?
Witness–Your Worship, after he was arrested he made several attempts to strike and kick Mr. Shera and myself; it was than I struck him.
Chairman–Are we to understand it was in self-defence you struck him?
Witness–Yes.
Mr. M’Gauran–Did you not jostle defendant before he assaulted you?
Witness–No; on the contrary I left the footpath to escape the prisoner; I ran to Mr. Shera’ assistance when a number of the party went to rescue the prisoner.
Mr. M’Gauran–Do you swear they wanted to rescue him?
Witness–I do; for they cried out to rescue him; I do not know who the other parties were.
Mr. M’Gauran–Will you swear defendant was not drunk?
Witness–I will.

Richard HUMPHRYS (a most intelligent lad of about 12 years old) sworn–Was coming home with John GREGG on the fair night; saw a number of men at BANNON’s public house door; John Gregg went off the footpath rather than pass through them…

The Chairman–Mr. M’Gauran, have you any witnesses for the defence?

Mr. M’Gauran–No, your Worship. I admit my client acted wrong, and that he has a right to be punished; but I would wish to state a few extenuating circumstances, that you may be pleased to award the punishment accordingly. As I am instructed by my client, he was unfortunately out on the night in question, and had taken too much drink this young man, Gregg, as I am instructed, jostled against him, and he confesses he struck him….Taking all these circumstances into account, I hope your Worships will consider a very small penalty sufficient.

The Chairman–The decision of the Bench is that you be imprisoned one month, with costs.

Head-Constable HARRISON summoned Farrel M’GOVERN, publican, for having his house open at prohibited hours for the sale of spirituous liquors. Fined 10s. and costs.

A few trifling cases having been heard, the Court rose.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , , , | Leave a comment