IMA Source Catalog

Gathering all the sources for historical Irish martial culture in one place.

Cavan Observer September 3, 1864

ASSAULT

Thomas M’KEON summoned James REEHILL for an assault. The case had been postponed on a previous day in consequence of the complainant being unable to attend….

Thomas M’KEON examined by Mr. M’Gauran–Lives in Ballanacarry; on the 18th of August last was lifting flax off the spread, and drawing it with a horse and cart; was passing by a meadow where REEHILL was mowing; on coming up to him bid him “the time of the day;” he replied that he would not allow any one to speak to him who had threatened to break his bones; I said I had never threatened to do so; he then jumped out on the road and struck at me with his fist; I warded off the blow as best I could; he then kicked me….In about an hour I began to feel the effects of the kicks…….

The Bench ordered Reehill to pay a fine of 10s and costs.

Advertisements

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism | , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer March 3, 1860

Patrick MONAGHAN, appellant; Sub-Inspector WEIR, respondent.

In this case the appellant had been sentenced to two months’ imprisonment, at the Ballyjamesduff Petty Sessions, for an assault upon the respondent, who is Sub Inspector of Constabulary at Ballyjamesduff.

Messrs. James and John Armstrong appeared for the appellant. Mr. S. Knipe appeared for the respondent and briefly stated the case.

Sub-Inspector WEIR was then called and examined.–On the 10th of January I was sitting in my own house; it was between 5 and 6 o’clock; I heard a row in the street opposite my house; I ran out and saw several persons fighting; MONAGHAN and a man named CRUMMY appeared to be the worst; they were in grips, fighting; I ran over, and caught each of them by the throat and told them they should come with me; CRUMMY’s wife told him not to resist; she said “for God’s sake go quietly;” MONAGHAN resisted and struck me several times with his fist….James M’GEBNEY deposed he was looking on during the assault on Mr. WEIR, and previously, saw CURRY and MONAGHAN fighting; they were fighting when Mr. WEIR ran out; saw MONAGHAN strike Mr. WEIR several blows…

Thomas CRUMMY examined by Mr. Armstrong–Is a broguemaker, and on the night of the row was quarrelling with another broguemaker, named COLWELL; it wasn’t a fight–only an argument about trade. Here Mr. CRUMMY turned and poured forth a torrent of vituperation upon the previous witness, calling him a thief, a robber, &c., and shouting that he (Mr. C) had to be constantly watching his potatoes to prevent him from stealing them……He was at length interrupted by the Chairman, who inquired if he knew where the gaol was?

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer July 5, 1862

Thomas M’GINNELL and two brothers named GALLIGAN were charged with having assaulted Pat. GAFFNEY, on Tuesday, the 10th of June. GAFFNEY’s informations stated that on the 10th of June he was in SHERIDAN’s public house in this town, and saw the prisoners disputing about drink with the servant girl; M’GINNELL was about to strike the girl for taking off his cap, and he interfered to protect her, upon which some angry words passed between himself and M’GINNELL; on his way home in the evening he was overtaken by the prisoners and some others near Lough Bray, and severely beaten by them; they struck him with sticks, knocked him down, kicked him, broke two of his teeth, and M’GINNELL struck him with a loaded butt. In his informations GAFFNEY fully identified the prisoners, but now he appeared to be troubled with a bad memory, and did all in his power to screen them from punishment by asserting that he could not identify them as his assailants. Vain were all attempts to induce him to give a direct answer to any question, and it was only under the threat of having his recognizance estreated he was induced to identify M’GINNELL. A young man named Patrick REILLY, summoned by the police, and who had witnessed the assault, fully identified M’GINNELL and one of the GALLIGANs; the other he was not sure of. Constable NOLAN, of Crosskeys, proved that he searched for the prisoners several times, but they evaded justice until lately…..The Court considered the charge proved against M’GINNELL and one of the GALLIGANs, and sentenced them to one month’s imprisonment, with hard labour. The other prisoner received the “benefit of the doubt,” and the Chairman rebuked GAFFNEY for his attempt to defeat the ends of justice. GAFFNEY had to pay for the stamps, and REILLY was allowed 3s expenses.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , | Leave a comment

BALLINA CHRONICLE Wednesday, July 3, 1850

At Galway Petty Sessions Mr. Thomas Hardy prosecuted Mr. Frederick P. Knight for having struck him with a stick and afterwards kicked him. The magistrates find the offender 2l. or a month’s imprisonment. Mr. Knight paid the fine and left the court. Shortly after Mr. Hardy returned to complain that immediately after going out Mr. Knight called him a “cowardly ruffian” and spat in his face. The magistrate having ordered Mr. Knight to be again brought up fined him 5l. or two months’ imprisonment.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, kicking, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , | Leave a comment

Cavan Observer 1864

LOCAL NEWS

MANSLAUGHTER IN THE COUNTY CAVAN–It is our painful duty to detail another case in which ungovernable passion, prompting the use of a dreadful weapon, known as a “loaded butt” has eventuated in the taking of life. The facts and circumstances of the present case, as transpired at the coroner’s inquest, appear to be, that a man, named Matthew FARRELLY, who resided between Bailieborough and Shercock, was, on the evening of the 11th ult., drinking in the public-house of William SLOANE, at Shercock. Farrelly was in conversation with a girl, when two men, named Daniel MARRON and Owen M’KENNA entered the house. Some altercation took place between the parties, when Marron struck Farrelly with a stick loaded with lead, and knocked him down. Whilst on the ground, Marron and his companion, M’Kenna, beat their victim so as to render him insensible, and from the effects of which he remained unconscious up to the hour of his death, which took place on the 26th ult. The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against Marron and M’Kenna, and they were committed to the county gaol to abide their trial at the forthcoming assizes. Our local magistrates have had frequently to comment on the use of this dreadful weapon–a “loaded butt”; and not long since, Mr. Thompson remarked that he would rather defend himself from a loaded pistol than a “loaded butt.” It is time that the use of these deadly instruments should be put a stop to.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, description of sticks, Old Newspaper clippings, prowess | , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 17 December 1912

DUBLIN TRAMP
——
SERGEANT STABBED
——
SCENE ON WICKLOW ROADSIDE
—— Arklow, Saturday.        The story of a fierce attack on a policeman was told yesterday evening at Rathdrum Workhouse hospital, when Mr A. Burke, J.P., attended to take the deposition of Sergeant Thos. Maguire, Aughrim, who, it is alleged, was repeatedly stabbed in the neck and head by a burly fellow who gave his name as Wm. Burke, but refused his address in Dublin.
   Sergeant Maguire stated that on the previous evening he was on patrol. A complaint was made about the conduct of two tramps outside Aughrim Catholic Church. He went to the spot and found an altercation going on between the prisoner and another man. Burke was using very vile language. Witness succeeded in getting both men away. Burke’s attitude was very violent, and witness followed him to put him past houses where there were women and small children. The prisoner then turned on him and said, “I have done nothing yet, but I will do something now.” He then rushed at witness with an open knife in his hand. He tried to defend himself with his stick and closed with the prisoner, whom he dropped in the water-table beside the road. While on the ground the prisoner stabbed him repeatedly in the neck and head.
   When the knife was produced the prisoner asked the magistrate to do him a favour and allow the police to give him the knife in order that he might cut his throat at once.
   Constable McNulty stated that when he heard of the incident he went in search of Burke, whom he overtook at Tinakilly. On seeing him the accused ran into a field where there was a large heap of stones, and began to throw them at witniess. When this ammunition was exhausted the prisoner drew a knife, and when witness closed with him he attempted to stab him in the body. He had Burke by the throat with one hand, and in defending himself from a blow of the knife directed at his stomach witness was stabbed in the hand. He succeeded eventually in disarming the prisoner of the knife, and when arrested Burke began to curse and use very bad language.
   The prisoner was remanded in custody for eight days.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, knife, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 1 October 1856

GRIEVOUS ASSAULT.
   Laurence Daly was charged with a grievous assault on James Bowden and John Henry Colvin, both members of the society of Friends, on the 21st August last, at Ballinure.    John H. Colvin and James Bowden were examined by Mr. P. O’Connell, Crown-solicitor, and proved that they were walking towards the Douglas Post-office, about 6½ oclock, on the evening in question, when between Mr. Crawford’s gate and Douglas, they perceived a man shouting towards them ; he appeared in a sailor’s dress, and had a bag or something in his hands ; when he came up to them, he accused them of throwing stones at him, which they denied, whereupon he struck Colvin with his clenched fist on the side of the head, and then took Mr. Bowden’s stick from him, and struck him with great force on the head, and cut his head in two places throught [sic] his hat ; they then struggled with him and got him down, calling loudly for help, when finding no one coming to their assistance, they thought it best to run away ; they had come to arrange the affairs of a deceased friend of theirs, who had been a tutor at Mr. Pike’s. Mr. Colvin was from Dublin, and Mr. Bowden from Surrey. 
   Mr. O’Hea, with Mr., Gillman, defended the prisoner, and called Mr. Denis Murpy as to character. The defense was, that the prisoner was under the impression that the prosecutors had been throwing stones at him. 
   The jury found him guilty of an assault occasioning actual bodily harm, one of the jurors in answer to his Worship amidst much laughter, stating that they had come to that decision without being influenced either by Mr. O’Hea’s eloquent speeches or his worship’s able charge. 
   The Court sentenced the prisoner to twelve months imprisonment at hard labour, observing that in his experience as Assistant Barrister for 20 years in this and the adjoining County he had never heard of a more unprovoked assault. Previous to that case he could assert that it was as safe to walk the roads of this county at night as the high streets of London in the day time, and that it was his duty, by the sentence in this case, to prevent such a thing occurring again.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, court, Old Newspaper clippings, pugilism, wrestling | , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Cork Examiner, 25 January 1882

LIMERICK INTELLIGENCE
—————
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)
Limerick, Tuesday.     
AFFRAY WITH THE MILITARY
   Last night, some soldiers of the 76th Regiment paid a visit to the old town, and for some cause or other, not as yet well explained, they came into collision with a number of civilians, with the result that something like a riot occurred. The military were outnumbered, and had, considerably, the worst of it, the Rifles in the end having to seek shelter in the Castle Barracks from their assailants. Stones and bricks were seen flying after the Rifles, and matters at one time became so serious that the military guard had to turn out at the barracks to keep back the crowd. An officer, who was passing up at the time, received a stroke of a stick in the leg, and some of the soldiers were also cut and scratched. No arrests have been made in connection with the occurrence.

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, Faction fight descriptions, Old Newspaper clippings | , , , , , | Leave a comment

L’opinion publique, Vol. 8, no. 30, pp. 354 (26 juillet 1877)

1877b

January 27, 2009 Posted by | as crime, Faction fight descriptions, Old Newspaper clippings, Period illustration | , , , , | Leave a comment